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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 501792, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/501792
Review Article

Endogenous Generation and Signaling Actions of Omega-3 Fatty Acid Electrophilic Derivatives

1Fondazione Ri.MED, Palermo, Italy
2Istituto di Biomedicina e Immunologia Molecolare (IBIM), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, 90146 Palermo, Italy

Received 9 September 2014; Revised 10 February 2015; Accepted 10 February 2015

Academic Editor: Gabriella Calviello

Copyright © 2015 Chiara Cipollina. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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