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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 504638, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/504638
Review Article

T Lymphocyte Dynamics in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Role of the Microbiome

1Department of Pediatrics, Steele Children’s Research Center, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA
2Department of Immunobiology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA

Received 3 April 2015; Accepted 28 May 2015

Academic Editor: Tinatin Chikovani

Copyright © 2015 C. B. Larmonier et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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