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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 596367, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/596367
Review Article

Effects of Light Intensity Activity on CVD Risk Factors: A Systematic Review of Intervention Studies

1Institute for Health and Social Science Research, Central Queensland University, Bruce Highway, Rockhampton, QLD 4702, Australia
2Centre for Physical Activity Studies, Central Queensland University, Bruce Highway, Rockhampton, QLD 4702, Australia
3School of Medicine & Public Health, Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle, University Drive, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
4Clinical Biochemistry Laboratory, Central Queensland University, Bruce Highway, Rockhampton, QLD 4702, Australia

Received 22 May 2015; Revised 13 September 2015; Accepted 20 September 2015

Academic Editor: Antonio Crisafulli

Copyright © 2015 Romeo B. Batacan Jr. et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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