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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 596572, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/596572
Research Article

Prognostic Factors of Returning to Work after Sick Leave due to Work-Related Common Mental Disorders: A One- and Three-Year Follow-Up Study

Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Bispebjerg University Hospital, Bispebjerg Bakke 23, 2400 Copenhagen NV, Denmark

Received 15 January 2015; Revised 14 March 2015; Accepted 20 March 2015

Academic Editor: Stavroula Leka

Copyright © 2015 Bo Netterstrøm et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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