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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 616834, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/616834
Review Article

Crosstalk between Red Blood Cells and the Immune System and Its Impact on Atherosclerosis

Department of Infectious, Parasitic and Immune-Mediated Diseases, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome, Italy

Received 26 June 2014; Accepted 16 January 2015

Academic Editor: Robin Van Bruggen

Copyright © 2015 Brigitta Buttari et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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