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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 624074, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/624074
Review Article

Molecular Imaging with MRI: Potential Application in Pancreatic Cancer

Sichuan Key Laboratory of Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Wenhua Road 63, Nanchong, Sichuan 637000, China

Received 24 August 2015; Revised 2 October 2015; Accepted 4 October 2015

Academic Editor: Weibo Cai

Copyright © 2015 Chen Chen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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