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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 634749, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/634749
Research Article

The Roles of miR-26, miR-29, and miR-203 in the Silencing of the Epigenetic Machinery during Melanocyte Transformation

1Department of Biochemistry, Federal University of Sao Paulo, 04044-020 Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil
2Department of Genetics and Evolutionary Biology, University of Sao Paulo, 05508-090 Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil
3Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa, Italy
4IRCCS AOU San Martino IST, 16132 Genoa, Italy
5Department of Pharmacology, Federal University of Sao Paulo, 04039-032 Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil

Received 7 July 2015; Accepted 12 October 2015

Academic Editor: Natarajan Muthusamy

Copyright © 2015 Cláudia Regina Gasque Schoof et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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