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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 639301, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/639301
Review Article

Functions of Kinesin Superfamily Proteins in Neuroreceptor Trafficking

Department of Neurobiology, Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology (Ministry of Health of China), Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058, China

Received 23 January 2015; Revised 22 April 2015; Accepted 27 April 2015

Academic Editor: Oliver von Bohlen und Halbach

Copyright © 2015 Na Wang and Junyu Xu. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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