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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 651415, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/651415
Research Article

Genetic and Cultural Reconstruction of the Migration of an Ancient Lineage

1Mayflower Organization for Research and Education, Sunnyvale, CA, USA
2Department of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110029, India
3Department of Pediatrics, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA

Received 10 May 2015; Revised 24 August 2015; Accepted 25 August 2015

Academic Editor: Peter J. Oefner

Copyright © 2015 Desmond D. Mascarenhas et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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