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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 670724, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/670724
Review Article

Mindful Emotion Regulation: Exploring the Neurocognitive Mechanisms behind Mindfulness

1Department of Cognitive Science (DiSCoF), University of Trento, Corso Bettini 84, Rovereto, 38068 Trentino, Italy
2Department of Data Analysis, Faculty of Psychology and Pedagogical Sciences, Ghent University, 1 Henri Dunantlaan, 9000 Ghent, Belgium
3Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust, Pinewood House, Pinewood Place, Dartford, Kent DA2 7WG, UK

Received 27 August 2014; Revised 26 November 2014; Accepted 1 December 2014

Academic Editor: Elisa Kozasa

Copyright © 2015 Alessandro Grecucci et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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