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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 674371, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/674371
Research Article

Activation of Sonic Hedgehog Leads to Survival Enhancement of Astrocytes via the GRP78-Dependent Pathway in Mice Infected with Angiostrongylus cantonensis

1Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan
2Department of Parasitology, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan
3Molecular Infectious Disease Research Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan

Received 25 November 2014; Accepted 16 March 2015

Academic Editor: Ruijin Huang

Copyright © 2015 Kuang-Yao Chen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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