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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 683279, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/683279
Research Article

Nonword Repetition and Speech Motor Control in Children

Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders, New York University, 665 Broadway, Suite 922, New York, NY 10012, USA

Received 23 January 2015; Accepted 23 April 2015

Academic Editor: Markus Hess

Copyright © 2015 Christina Reuterskiöld and Maria I. Grigos. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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