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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 709846, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/709846
Review Article

Modulation of Intrathymic Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Levels Promotes Escape of Immature Thymocytes to the Periphery with a Potential Proinflammatory Role in Chagas Disease

1Instituto de Microbiologia, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21941-590 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil
2Instituto de Biofísica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21941-590 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil

Received 27 February 2015; Accepted 21 May 2015

Academic Editor: Carina Strell

Copyright © 2015 Ana Flávia Nardy et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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