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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 749745, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/749745
Research Article

Right-to-Left Shunt Does Not Increase the Incidence of Silent Lacunar Infarcts in Patients with Migraine

1Neuroscience Center, Department of Neurology, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Jilin University, Changchun 130021, China
2Department of Clinical Medicine, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130021, China

Received 21 May 2015; Accepted 23 June 2015

Academic Editor: Alessandro Giardini

Copyright © 2015 Wei Du et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Right-to-left shunt (RLS) is associated with cryptogenic stroke and migraine. Herein we investigated the relationship between RLS and silent lacunar infarcts in patients with migraine. A total of 263 patients with migraine who met eligibility criteria were enrolled from January 2010 to December 2011, among which 127 subjects fell into RLS group. Baseline demographics were comparable between RLS and non-RLS groups (). The incidence of silent lacunar infarcts in RLS group was not significantly different from that of the non-RLS group (25.2% versus 21.3%, ). Furthermore, we found that the incidence of silent lacunar infarcts in permanent and latent RLS subgroups was comparable with non-shunt RLS subgroup (28.6% versus 24% versus 21.3%, ). Similarly, the incidence of silent lacunar infarcts in the non-RLS group, mild-shunt group, and large-shunt group was also comparable (21.3% versus 23.8% versus 29.3%, ). In addition, RLS did not increase the incidence of silent lacunar infarcts in migraine patients with elder age (<50 years age group: 15.8% versus 17.9%; ≥50 years age group: 53.1% versus 37.5%, both ). In conclusion, RLS does not increase the incidence of silent lacunar infarcts in patients with migraine. Further prospective studies are warranted to validate this finding.