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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 760758, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/760758
Review Article

Molecular Targets in Alzheimer’s Disease: From Pathogenesis to Therapeutics

Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, China

Received 23 August 2015; Revised 2 November 2015; Accepted 3 November 2015

Academic Editor: Mikko Hiltunen

Copyright © 2015 Xuan Cheng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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