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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 781241, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/781241
Research Article

Cortisol Response to Psychosocial Stress in Chinese Early Puberty Girls: Possible Role of Depressive Symptoms

1Department of Maternal, Child & Adolescent Health, School of Public Health, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui 230032, China
2Anhui Provincial Key Laboratory of Population Health & Aristogenics, Hefei, Anhui 230032, China

Received 31 December 2014; Revised 17 April 2015; Accepted 21 May 2015

Academic Editor: Giuseppe Piccione

Copyright © 2015 Ying Sun et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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