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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 786861, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/786861
Research Article

Lengths of Orthologous Prokaryotic Proteins Are Affected by Evolutionary Factors

1Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90027, USA
2Department of Evolutionary and Environmental Biology and Institute of Evolution, University of Haifa, 3498838 Haifa, Israel
3Department of Computer Science, University of Haifa, 3498838 Haifa, Israel
4The Tauber Bioinformatics Research Center, University of Haifa, 3498838 Haifa, Israel

Received 8 September 2014; Accepted 2 November 2014

Academic Editor: Vassily Lyubetsky

Copyright © 2015 Tatiana Tatarinova et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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