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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 819389, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/819389
Review Article

Iron Homeostasis and Trypanosoma brucei Associated Immunopathogenicity Development: A Battle/Quest for Iron

1Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Immunology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), 1050 Brussels, Belgium
2Department of Myeloid Cell Immunology, Vlaams Instituut voor Biotechnologie (VIB), 1050 Brussels, Belgium
3Department of Structural Biology, Vlaams Instituut voor Biotechnologie (VIB), 1050 Brussels, Belgium

Received 7 October 2014; Revised 11 February 2015; Accepted 15 February 2015

Academic Editor: Rossana Arroyo

Copyright © 2015 Benoit Stijlemans et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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