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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 821596, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/821596
Research Article

Nucleosome Organization around Pseudogenes in the Human Genome

1The Institute of Bioengineering and Technology, Inner Mongolia University of Science and Technology, Baotou 014010, China
2School of Mathematics, Physics, and Biological Engineering, Inner Mongolia University of Science and Technology, Baotou 014010, China

Received 9 September 2014; Accepted 17 December 2014

Academic Editor: Elena Papaleo

Copyright © 2015 Guoqing Liu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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