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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 847152, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/847152
Research Article

Monitoring Microcirculatory Blood Flow with a New Sublingual Tonometer in a Porcine Model of Hemorrhagic Shock

1Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Therapy, University of Szeged, 6 Semmelweis Street, Szeged 6725, Hungary
2Institute of Surgical Research, University of Szeged, 6 Szőkefalvi-Nagy Béla Street, Szeged 6720, Hungary

Received 21 January 2015; Revised 23 March 2015; Accepted 24 March 2015

Academic Editor: Stephen M. Cohn

Copyright © 2015 Péter Palágyi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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