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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 847320, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/847320
Research Article

Topical Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Isorhamnetin Glycosides Isolated from Opuntia ficus-indica

Centro de Biotecnología-FEMSA, Tecnológico de Monterrey, Avenida Eugenio Garza Sada 2501 Sur, 64849 Monterrey, NL, Mexico

Received 9 October 2014; Revised 15 December 2014; Accepted 16 December 2014

Academic Editor: Maxim E. Darvin

Copyright © 2015 Marilena Antunes-Ricardo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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