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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 847529, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/847529
Review Article

Genetic Polymorphism in Extracellular Regulators of Wnt Signaling Pathway

1Institute for Skeletal Aging & Orthopaedic Surgery, Hallym University-Chuncheon Sacred Heart Hospital, Chuncheon-si, Gangwon-do 200-704, Republic of Korea
2Amity Institute of Nanotechnology, Amity University Uttar Pradesh, Noida, Uttar Pradesh 201313, India
3Adbiotech Co., Ltd., Chuncheon-si, Gangwon-do 200-880, Republic of Korea

Received 16 January 2015; Accepted 5 March 2015

Academic Editor: Andrei Surguchov

Copyright © 2015 Garima Sharma et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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