Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 853836, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/853836
Research Article

Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Detecting Sesame Seed in Foods

1Food Allergy Research and Resource Program, Department of Food Science and Technology, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68588-6207, USA
2The Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, Directorate of Food Control and Central Food Research, 16036 Bursa, Turkey

Received 29 September 2015; Revised 15 November 2015; Accepted 23 November 2015

Academic Editor: Jose C. Jimenez-Lopez

Copyright © 2015 Stef J. Koppelman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Small amounts of sesame can trigger allergic reactions in sesame-allergic patients. Because sesame is a widely used food ingredient, analytical methods are needed to support quality control and food safety programs in the food industry. In this study, polyclonal antibodies against sesame seed proteins were raised, and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed for the detection and quantification of sesame seed residue in food. A comparison was made between this ELISA and other assays, particularly focusing on recovery of sesame seed residue from different food matrices. The developed ELISA is sensitive with a lower limit of quantification of 0.5 ppm and shows essentially no cross-reactivity with other foods or food ingredients (92 tested). The ELISA has a good recovery for analyzing sesame-based tahini in peanut butter, outperforming one other test. In a baked bread matrix, the ELISA has a low recovery, while two other assays perform better. We conclude that a sensitive and specific ELISA can be constructed based on polyclonal antibodies, which is suitable for detection of small amounts of sesame seed relevant for highly allergic patients. Furthermore, we conclude that different food products may require different assays to ensure adequate quantification of sesame.