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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 857536, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/857536
Research Article

The Effects of Metabolic Work Rate and Ambient Environment on Physiological Tolerance Times While Wearing Explosive and Chemical Personal Protective Equipment

School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences and Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, QLD 4059, Australia

Received 14 August 2014; Revised 7 October 2014; Accepted 1 November 2014

Academic Editor: David Bellar

Copyright © 2015 Joseph T. Costello et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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