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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 859084, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/859084
Research Article

Endogenous Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence Provides Label-Free Visualization of the Inflammatory Response in the Rodent Spinal Cord

1Neurosurgery, Carl Gustav Carus University Hospital, TU Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, 01307 Dresden, Germany
2Clinical Sensoring and Monitoring, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Carl Gustav Carus University Hospital, TU Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, 01307 Dresden, Germany
3Centre for Translational Bone, Joint and Soft Tissue Research, Carl Gustav Carus University Hospital, TU Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, 01307 Dresden, Germany
4Department of Clinical Pathobiochemistry, Carl Gustav Carus University Hospital, TU Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, 01307 Dresden, Germany
5Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD), TU Dresden, Fetscherstrasse 105, 01307 Dresden, Germany

Received 20 March 2015; Revised 19 July 2015; Accepted 27 July 2015

Academic Editor: Marija Mostarica-Stojković

Copyright © 2015 Ortrud Uckermann et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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