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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 872684, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/872684
Research Article

The Combined Inhibitory Effect of the Adenosine A1 and Cannabinoid CB1 Receptors on cAMP Accumulation in the Hippocampus Is Additive and Independent of A1 Receptor Desensitization

1Health Sciences Research Center, University of Beira Interior (CICS-UBI), Avenida Infante D. Henrique, 6200-506 Covilhã, Portugal
2Institute of Pharmacology and Neurosciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Lisbon, Avenida Professor Egas Moniz, 1649-028 Lisbon, Portugal
3Unit of Neurosciences, Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Lisbon, Avenida Professor Egas Moniz, 1649-028 Lisbon, Portugal
4Department of Chemistry, University of Beira Interior, Rua Marquês D’Ávila e Bolama, 6201-001 Covilhã, Portugal

Received 5 September 2014; Revised 5 December 2014; Accepted 21 December 2014

Academic Editor: George Perry

Copyright © 2015 André Serpa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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