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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 891671, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/891671
Review Article

Measuring a Journey without Goal: Meditation, Spirituality, and Physiology

1School of Psychology, Massey University, Private Bag 102904, North Shore Mail Centre, Auckland 0745, New Zealand
2Mind and Life Institute, Amherst College, 271 South Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01002, USA

Received 21 August 2014; Revised 17 November 2014; Accepted 26 November 2014

Academic Editor: Elisa Kozasa

Copyright © 2015 Heather Buttle. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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