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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 937148, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/937148
Research Article

Histamine Induces Alzheimer’s Disease-Like Blood Brain Barrier Breach and Local Cellular Responses in Mouse Brain Organotypic Cultures

1Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Rowan University, Stratford, NJ 08084, USA
2Department of Cell Biology, Rowan School of Osteopathic Medicine, Stratford, NJ 08084, USA
3Biomarker Discovery Center, New Jersey Institute for Successful Aging, Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine, Stratford, NJ 08084, USA
4Department of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine, Stratford, NJ 08084, USA

Received 21 August 2015; Revised 30 October 2015; Accepted 8 November 2015

Academic Editor: Wiep Scheper

Copyright © 2015 Jonathan C. Sedeyn et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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