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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 954283, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/954283
Research Article

Contribution of Electronic Medical Records to the Management of Rare Diseases

1Ophthalmology Department, Amiens University Medical Center, University of Picardie Jules Verne, 80054 Amiens, France
2Ophthalmology Department, University Medical Center Necker Enfants Malades, APHP and CNRS Unit FR3636, Paris V University, 75015 Paris, France
3Department of Medical Information, Amiens University Medical Center, 80054 Amiens, France
4Cytogenetics and Reproduction Biology, Amiens University Medical Center, University of Picardie Jules Verne, 80054 Amiens, France
5EA Hervy, 80000 Amiens, France

Received 5 May 2015; Accepted 21 July 2015

Academic Editor: Ariel Beresniak

Copyright © 2015 Dominique Bremond-Gignac et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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