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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 971697, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/971697
Review Article

Roles of Akt and SGK1 in the Regulation of Renal Tubular Transport

1Department of Nephrology, The University of Tokyo Hospital, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8655, Japan
2Yaizu City Hospital, 1000 Dobara, Yaizu, Shizuoka 425-8505, Japan

Received 3 July 2015; Accepted 6 September 2015

Academic Editor: Goutam Ghosh Choudhury

Copyright © 2015 Nobuhiko Satoh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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