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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 979530, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/979530
Research Article

Active Microbial Communities Inhabit Sulphate-Methane Interphase in Deep Bedrock Fracture Fluids in Olkiluoto, Finland

1VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, 02044 Espoo, Finland
2Posiva Oy, Olkiluoto, 27160 Eurajoki, Finland

Received 6 January 2015; Accepted 4 March 2015

Academic Editor: Weixing Feng

Copyright © 2015 Malin Bomberg et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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