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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 1247191, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1247191
Research Article

Protective Effects of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester on Fluoxetine-Induced Hepatotoxicity: An Experimental Study

1Department of Family Physicians, Faculty of Medicine, Dicle University, 21280 Diyarbakir, Turkey
2Department of Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Dicle University, 21280 Diyarbakir, Turkey
3Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Zirve University, 27260 Gaziantep, Turkey
4Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Dicle University, 21280 Diyarbakir, Turkey
5Department of Pediatric Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Dicle University, 21280 Diyarbakir, Turkey
6Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Dicle University, 21280 Diyarbakir, Turkey

Received 14 January 2016; Revised 9 March 2016; Accepted 27 March 2016

Academic Editor: Kazim Husain

Copyright © 2016 Ahmet Yılmaz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. The aim of the study was to analyse the effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on fluoxetine-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Materials and Methods. Group I served as control. Group II received CAPE intraperitoneally. Group III received fluoxetine per orally. Group IV received fluoxetine and CAPE. The total antioxidant capacity (TAC), total oxidant status (TOS), oxidative stress index (OSI), and liver enzymes including paraoxonase-1 (PON-1), aspartate transaminase, and alanine transaminase levels were measured. Liver tissues were processed histopathologically for evaluation of liver injury and to validate the serum enzyme levels. Results. An increase in TOS and OSI and a decrease in TAC and PON-1 levels in serum and liver tissues of Group III were observed compared to Groups I and II. After treatment with CAPE, the level of TOS and OSI decreased while TAC and PON-1 increased in serum and liver in Group IV. Histopathological examination of the liver revealed hepatic injury after fluoxetine treatment and reduction of injury with CAPE treatment. Conclusion. Our results suggested that CAPE treatment provided protection against fluoxetine toxicity. Following CAPE treatment with fluoxetine-induced hepatotoxicity, TOS and OSI levels decreased, whereas PON-1 and TAC increased in the serum and liver.