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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 1575430, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1575430
Research Article

An Ash1-Like Protein MoKMT2H Null Mutant Is Delayed for Conidium Germination and Pathogenesis in Magnaporthe oryzae

Beijing Key Laboratory of New Technique in Agricultural Application College of Plant Science and Technology, Beijing University of Agriculture, Beijing 100026, China

Received 2 June 2016; Revised 15 July 2016; Accepted 19 July 2016

Academic Editor: Vijai Bhadauria

Copyright © 2016 Zhaojun Cao et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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