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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 1630365, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1630365
Review Article

Secondary Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis: From Podocyte Injury to Glomerulosclerosis

1Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju 220-701, Republic of Korea
2Departments of Physiology and Global Medical Science, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju 220-701, Republic of Korea

Received 25 December 2015; Accepted 10 March 2016

Academic Editor: Andreas Kronbichler

Copyright © 2016 Jae Seok Kim et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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