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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 1652417, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1652417
Review Article

The Regulatory Roles of MicroRNAs in Bone Remodeling and Perspectives as Biomarkers in Osteoporosis

1Department of Spine Surgery, Shenzhen People’s Hospital, Jinan University School of Medicine, Shenzhen 518020, China
2Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, The University of Hong Kong, 21 Sassoon Road, Pokfulam, Hong Kong
3Center for Human Tissues and Organs Degeneration, Shenzhen Institute of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen 518055, China
4Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China
5Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing 100730, China

Received 5 December 2015; Revised 26 February 2016; Accepted 29 February 2016

Academic Editor: Jozef Zustin

Copyright © 2016 Mengge Sun et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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