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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 1829148, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1829148
Review Article

Advances in Engineered Liver Models for Investigating Drug-Induced Liver Injury

1School of Biomedical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
2Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607, USA

Received 23 April 2016; Accepted 19 July 2016

Academic Editor: Jurgen Borlak

Copyright © 2016 Christine Lin and Salman R. Khetani. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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