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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 1946585, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1946585
Review Article

Advances in Molecular Imaging Strategies for In Vivo Tracking of Immune Cells

Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine and Hospital, Daegu, Republic of Korea

Received 27 May 2016; Revised 12 August 2016; Accepted 23 August 2016

Academic Editor: Patrizia Rovere-Querini

Copyright © 2016 Ho Won Lee et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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