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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 2174657, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2174657
Research Article

Predominance of Abdominal Visceral Adipose Tissue Reflects the Presence of Aortic Valve Calcification

Department of Cardiology and Hematology, Fukushima Medical University, 1 Hikarigaoka, Fukushima 960-1295, Japan

Received 6 August 2015; Revised 2 December 2015; Accepted 28 December 2015

Academic Editor: Ramazan Akdemir

Copyright © 2016 Masayoshi Oikawa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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