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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 2568635, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2568635
Review Article

The Impact of External Factors on the Epigenome: In Utero and over Lifetime

1Cancer Epigenetics Laboratory, Instituto Universitario de Oncología del Principado de Asturias (IUOPA), HUCA, Universidad de Oviedo, 33006 Oviedo, Spain
2Servicio de Salud Laboral, Instituto Asturiano de Prevención de Riesgos Laborales, 33006 Oviedo, Spain

Received 19 February 2016; Revised 12 April 2016; Accepted 26 April 2016

Academic Editor: Max Costa

Copyright © 2016 Estela G. Toraño et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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