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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 3416864, 7 pages
Research Article

Characteristics of Salmonella spp. Isolated from Wild Birds Confiscated in Illegal Trade Markets, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

1Departamento de Epidemiologia e Saúde Pública, Instituto de Veterinária, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, 23890-000 Seropédica, RJ, Brazil
2Escola Nacional de Saúde Pública Sérgio Arouca, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, 21041-210 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil
3Laboratório de Referência Nacional de Enteroinfecções Bacterianas, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, 21040-360 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil
4Laboratório Central de Saúde Pública de Santa Catarina, 88010-002 Florianópolis, SC, Brazil

Received 30 August 2015; Revised 26 October 2015; Accepted 29 November 2015

Academic Editor: Wen-Jun Li

Copyright © 2016 Carlos Alexandre Rey Matias et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


The prevalence of Salmonella spp. was investigated in 109 wild birds poached in the illegal wildlife trade in Rio de Janeiro; most of them are passerines from Thraupidae family and three from Psittacidae. One strain of Salmonella ser. Typhimurium and two strains of Salmonella ser. Panama were isolated from passerine species and all of them showed resistance to multiple antimicrobial drugs, like ampicillin, ceftriaxone, ceftiofur, tetracycline, gentamicin, nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin, and enrofloxacin. PFGE showed 100% similarity among the Salmonella ser. Typhimurium strain isolated from a Temminck’s seedeater (Sporophila falcirostris) and the strains isolated from a human outbreak, in southern Brazil. The two Salmonella ser. Panama strains isolated from two chestnut-capped blackbirds (Chrysomus ruficapillus) present in the same catch showed the same clonal origin and have never been associated with epizooties and human outbreaks. Potential for dissemination of resistant Salmonella through situations offered by captive management and the isolation of the same strain from wild birds and human sources may become a problem for the conservation of natural populations and to public health.