Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 3645415, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3645415
Research Article

Evaluating Religious Influences on the Utilization of Maternal Health Services among Muslim and Christian Women in North-Central Nigeria

1Institute of Human Virology Nigeria, Plot 252 Herbert Macaulay Way, Abuja 900246, Nigeria
2School of Social Work, University of Georgia, 279 Williams Street, Athens, GA 30602, USA
3Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, PMB 3452, Kano 700231, Nigeria
4Department of Health Promotion and Education, University of Ibadan, Ibadan 200284, Nigeria
5School of Social Work, University of Maryland Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250, USA
6Division of Epidemiology and Prevention, Institute of Human Virology, University of Maryland Baltimore, 725 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA

Received 31 October 2015; Accepted 18 January 2016

Academic Editor: Kasonde Mwinga

Copyright © 2016 Maryam Al-Mujtaba et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. UNAIDS, Begining of the End of the AIDS Epidemic, the Gap Report, Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), Geneva, Switzerland, 2014.
  2. World Health Organization, HIV Reporting: Global Update on Health Sector Response to HIV, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland, 2014.
  3. National Agency for the Control of AIDS (NACA), Global AIDS and Response Country Progress Report (GARPR 2014), National Agency for the Control of AIDS, Abuja, Nigeria, 2014.
  4. UNAIDS, 2014 Progress Report on the Global Plan: Towards the Elimination of New HIV Infections among Children by 2015 and Keeping their Mothers Alive, UNAIDS, Geneva, Switzerland, 2014.
  5. World Health Organization, Maternal Health, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland, 2015, http://www.who.int/topics/maternal_health/en/.
  6. National Bureau of Statistics, “The millenium development goals performance tracking survey report 2014,” http://www.nigerianstat.gov.ng/pages/NBS%20eLibrary.
  7. Federal Ministry of Health, National HIV&AIDS and Reproductive Health Survey, 2012 (NARHS II Plus), Federal Ministry of Health, Abuja, Nigeria, 2013.
  8. National Population Commission (NPC) and ICF International, Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey 2013, National Population Commision, Abuja, Nigeria; ICF International, Rockville, Md, USA, 2014.
  9. A. F. Fagbamigbe and E. S. Idemudia, “Barriers to antenatal care use in Nigeria: evidences from non-users and implications for maternal health programming,” BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, vol. 15, no. 1, article 95, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  10. UNAIDS, Gender Matters: Overcoming Gender-Related Barriers to Prevent New HIV Infections among Children and Keep their Mothers Alive, UNAIDS, Geneva, Switzerland, 2014.
  11. International Community of Women Living with HIV/AIDS HPW, Poverty and Gender Inequality, Buenos Aires, Argentina, 2004.
  12. J. K. Ganle, “Why Muslim women in Northern Ghana do not use skilled maternal healthcare services at health facilities: a qualitative study,” BMC International Health and Human Rights, vol. 15, no. 1, article 10, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  13. S. A. Hussen, M. Tsegaye, M. G. Argaw, K. Andes, D. Gilliard, and C. del Rio, “Spirituality, social capital and service: factors promoting resilience among Expert Patients living with HIV in Ethiopia,” Global Public Health, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 286–298, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. Population Reference Bureau, “World population data sheet with a special focus on women's empowerment,” 2015 World Population Data Sheet, Population Reference Bureau, 2015. View at Google Scholar
  15. S. B. Kavita Singh and P. Brodish, “Influence of gender measures on maternal and child health in Africa,” Measure Evaluation Technical Report, Measure Evaluation Carolina Population Center, Chapel Hill, NC, USA, 2011. View at Google Scholar
  16. B. M. Fapohunda and N. G. Orobaton, “When women deliver with no one present in Nigeria: who, what, where and so what?” PLoS ONE, vol. 8, no. 7, Article ID e69569, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. World Health Organization, World Health Statistics 2014, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland, 2014.
  18. Centre for Reproductive Rights (CRR) and Women Advocates Research and Documentation Center (WARDC), Broken Promises: Human Rights, Accountability, and Maternal Death in Nigeria, CRR, New York, NY, USA; WARDC, Lagos, Nigeria, 2008.
  19. W. Newbrander, K. Natiq, S. Shahim, N. Hamid, and N. B. Skena, “Barriers to appropriate care for mothers and infants during the perinatal period in rural Afghanistan: a qualitative assessment,” Global Public Health, vol. 9, supplement 1, pp. S93–S109, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. R. H. Remien, J. Chowdhury, J. E. Mokhbat, C. Soliman, M. El Adawy, and W. El-Sadr, “Gender and care: access to HIV testing, care, and treatment,” Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, vol. 51, supplement 3, pp. S106–S110, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. K. Omer, N. J. Afi, M. C. Baba et al., “Seeking evidence to support efforts to increase use of antenatal care: a cross-sectional study in two states of Nigeria,” BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, vol. 14, no. 1, article 380, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  22. H. V. Doctor, S. E. Findley, A. Ager et al., “Using community-based research to shape the design and delivery of maternal health services in Northern Nigeria,” Reproductive Health Matters, vol. 20, no. 39, pp. 104–112, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. National Population Commission (NPC), 2006 Population and Housing Census of the Federal Republic of Nigeria. National and State Population and Housing Tables, Priority Tables, NPC, Abuja, Nigeria, 2006.
  24. National AIDS/STI Control Programme and Federal Ministry of Health Nigeria, “National HIV seroprevalence sentinel survey among pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in Nigeria,” Tech. Rep., 2010. View at Google Scholar
  25. N. Rollins, H. Chanza, F. Chimbwandira et al., “Prioritizing the PMTCT implementation research agenda in 3 African countries: INtegrating and Scaling up PMTCT through Implementation REsearch (INSPIRE),” Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, vol. 67, supplement 2, pp. S108–S113, 1999. View at Google Scholar
  26. N. A. Sam-Agudu, L. J. Cornelius, J. N. Okundaye et al., “The impact of mentor mother programs on PMTCT service uptake and retention-in-care at primary health care facilities in Nigeria: a prospective cohort study (MoMent Nigeria),” Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, vol. 67, supplement 2, pp. S132–S138, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  27. Hadith, “Hajj of women,” in Sahih Al-Bukhari, Book 28: Number 42, chapter 26, 1862. View at Google Scholar
  28. Z. Iliyasu, I. S. Abubakar, H. S. Galadanci, and M. H. Aliyu, “Birth preparedness, complication readiness and fathers' participation in maternity care in a northern Nigerian community,” African Journal of Reproductive Health, vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 21–32, 2010. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. C. A. Uzondu, H. V. Doctor, S. E. Findley, G. Y. Afenyadu, and A. Ager, “Female health workers at the doorstep: a pilot of community-based maternal, newborn, and child health service delivery in northern Nigeria,” Global Health: Science and Practice, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 97–108, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar