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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 3747501, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3747501
Review Article

Involvement of Hormone- and ROS-Signaling Pathways in the Beneficial Action of Humic Substances on Plants Growing under Normal and Stressing Conditions

1Soil Biology Laboratory, Department of Soil, Federal Rural University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Rodovia BR 465 km 7, 23890-000 Seropédica, RJ, Brazil
2Department of Environmental Biology, Agricultural Chemistry and Biology Group-CMI Roullier, Faculty of Sciences, University of Navarra, C/Irunlarrea 1, 31008 Pamplona, Spain

Received 31 December 2015; Revised 10 April 2016; Accepted 3 May 2016

Academic Editor: Yan-Bo Hu

Copyright © 2016 Andrés Calderín García et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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