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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 3765608, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3765608
Review Article

Circulating Permeability Factors in Primary Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis: A Review of Proposed Candidates

Department of Nephrology, University Hospital, Heinrich-Heine University, Moorenstrasse 5, 40225 Duesseldorf, Germany

Received 23 December 2015; Accepted 22 February 2016

Academic Editor: Jae Il Shin

Copyright © 2016 Eva Königshausen and Lorenz Sellin. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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