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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 5186461, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5186461
Research Article

Use of NeuroEyeCoach™ to Improve Eye Movement Efficacy in Patients with Homonymous Visual Field Loss

1School of Psychology, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, AB24 3FX, UK
2Neuromotor and Cognitive Rehabilitation Research Centre, Department of Neurological and Movement Sciences, University of Verona, Verona, Italy
3Neurorehabilitation Unit, Borgo Roma University Hospital, P.le L.A. Scuro 10, 37134 Verona, Italy
4Department Psychology, LMU University of Munich, Leopoldstrasse 13, 80804 München, Germany

Received 14 April 2016; Revised 21 July 2016; Accepted 3 August 2016

Academic Editor: Jeremy A. Guggenheim

Copyright © 2016 Arash Sahraie et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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