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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 5812092, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5812092
Research Article

Effects of Physical-Cognitive Dual Task Training on Executive Function and Gait Performance in Older Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Department of Movement, Human and Health Sciences, University of Rome Foro Italico, Rome, Italy

Received 1 June 2016; Revised 19 September 2016; Accepted 25 October 2016

Academic Editor: David C. Hughes

Copyright © 2016 S. Falbo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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