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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 6150976, 30 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6150976
Review Article

Preconception Care: A New Standard of Care within Maternal Health Services

1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T5H 3V9
2University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada
3Millcreek Environmental Health Clinic, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6K 4C1

Received 31 December 2015; Accepted 18 April 2016

Academic Editor: Jose Guilherme Cecatti

Copyright © 2016 Stephen J. Genuis and Rebecca A. Genuis. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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