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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 6171352, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6171352
Research Article

The Effect of Advanced Motherhood on Newborn Offspring’s Hippocampal Neural Stem Cell Proliferation

1Department of Physiology, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450001, China
2Stem Cell Research Center of Medical College, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450052, China
3Department of Pathophysiology, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450001, China

Received 10 May 2016; Revised 9 July 2016; Accepted 12 July 2016

Academic Editor: Oliver von Bohlen und Halbach

Copyright © 2016 Bo Li et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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