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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 6437658, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6437658
Research Article

Efficiency of Human Epiphyseal Chondrocytes with Differential Replication Numbers for Cellular Therapy Products

1Department of Reproductive Biology, National Research Institute for Child Health and Development, Tokyo 157-8535, Japan
2Department of Orthopedic Surgery, National Research Institute for Child Health and Development, Tokyo 157-8535, Japan

Received 21 February 2016; Revised 14 August 2016; Accepted 15 August 2016

Academic Editor: Magali Cucchiarini

Copyright © 2016 Michiyo Nasu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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