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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 6505383, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6505383
Research Article

Polyphenols from Chilean Propolis and Pinocembrin Reduce MMP-9 Gene Expression and Activity in Activated Macrophages

1Center of Molecular Biology and Pharmacogenetics, Department of Basic Sciences, Scientific and Technological Bioresource Nucleus, Universidad de La Frontera, Avenida Francisco Salazar 01145, 4811230 Temuco, Chile
2Department of Clinical and Toxicological Analyses, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Universidade de São Paulo, Avenida Professor Lineu Prestes 580, 05508-000 São Paulo, SP, Brazil

Received 16 December 2015; Accepted 7 March 2016

Academic Editor: Nikos Chorianopoulos

Copyright © 2016 Nicolás Saavedra et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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