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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 6745028, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6745028
Research Article

Evolution of bopA Gene in Burkholderia: A Case of Convergent Evolution as a Mechanism for Bacterial Autophagy Evasion

1Beijing Institute of Biotechnology, Beijing, China
2The Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China
3Anhui University, Hefei, Anhui, China

Received 14 July 2016; Revised 13 October 2016; Accepted 24 October 2016

Academic Editor: Janusz Blasiak

Copyright © 2016 Dong Yu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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